Greenpeace photographers document the story of e-waste

The MRC team brought a provocative piece of pavement art to Mobile World Congress today to highlight the issue of electronic waste. But the back-story is more impactful still, as these Greenpeace images reveal.

#ewaste #electronicwaste #designedtobreak #plannedobsolescence #betterfuture #mwc18 #mobileworldcongress

A small Chinese child sitting among cables and e-waste, Guiyu, China. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia as it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. This practice exposes the workers and communities involved in dismantling e-waste to serious, environmental problems, danger and health hazards. Greenpeace is strongly urging major manufactures to exclude toxic materials from their products.

 

A young girl stands near stacks of used electronics at the electronic waste shelter in Jombang, East Java.

 

Electronic waste ready for smelting process at a smelter in Jombang, East Java.

 

Electronic waste at a smelter in Jombang, East Java.

 

Electronic waste ready for the smelting process at a smelter in Jombang, East Java.

 

A smelting process for the electronic waste at a smelter in Jombang, East Java.

 

A worker sorts electronic waste during smelting process at a smelter in Jombang, East Java.

 

A scrapyard boss watches over piles of e-waste, Nanyang, China. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia as it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. This practise exposes the workers and communities involved in dismantling e-waste to serious, environmental problems, danger and health hazards. Greenpeace is strongly urging major manufactures to exclude toxic materials from their products.

 

 

A child runs next to a fire where electronic cables and other electrical components are being burned in order to melt off the plastic and reclaim the copper wiring. This burning in small fires releases toxic chemicals into the environment.

 

Computer and TV monitor casings being used as “stepping stones” in a lagoon.

 

 

Birds and other animals feed on a dead horse decomposing in the Lyari riverbed.

 

Waste is burnt off everyday and every night too. Dense smoke is a constant feature of the Lyari area. Iqbal Hussein (20, right) makes sure the fire burns off all the plastic.

 

Huge piles of plastic, monitors and other electronics are collected. They will be shredded, bleached and then sold.

 

Greenpeace activists block the main entrance of the Hewlett Packard office in Utrecht with a wall of one thousand old HP computers.

 

Pile of computer keyboards ready to be scrapped, Nanyang, China. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia as it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. This practise exposes the workers and communities involved in dismantling e-waste to serious, environmental problems, danger and health hazards. Greenpeace is strongly urging major manufactures to exclude toxic materials from their products.

 

A woman washes clothing in a polluted river, Guiyu, China. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia as it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. This practise exposes the workers and communities involved in dismantling e-waste to serious, environmental problems, danger and health hazards. Greenpeace is strongly urging major manufactures to exclude toxic materials from their products.

 

 

E-waste set on fire in the ChaoYang District, ShanTou City. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia because it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. Workers involved in dismantling e-waste are exposed to serious, environmental problems, danger and health hazards.

 

Greenpeace activists demonstrate against e-waste (electronic waste) outside the Hewlett Packard (HP) Beijing headquarters.
Greenpeace is calling on all electronic companies to produce cleaner, longer lasting products. Greenpeace further more demands that they take full responsibility for their products over the whole life cycle and especially when the products become waste.

By | 2018-02-26T20:26:33+00:00 February 26th, 2018|0 Comments